Email:

    hamalnanizam@yahoo.com


    Contact:

    +8801715144024

    Address:

    English Discipline, Kobi Jibanananda Das Academic Building, Khulna University, Khulna-9208, Bangladesh


Hamalna Nizam
Assistant Professor

Hi, I am Hamalna Nizam, currently working as an Assistant Professor at English Discipline, Khulna University. I obtained my BA (Hons.) and MA in English from Khulna University, Bangladesh. My research interest includes Queer Studies, Film Studies, Feminism, Adaptation Studies and Literary Theory

MA in English (Khulna University, Bangladesh), BA (Hons.) in English (Khulna University, Bangladesh)

Queer Studies, Film Studies, Feminism, Adaptation Studies and Literary Theory

Current Research Project/Collaboration

SL Title Research Role Awarded Date Completion Date Funding Agency
No Research Project Available

1. Assistant Professor at Khulna University (from 12-02-2018 to to-date)

2. Lecturer at Khulna University (from 12-9-2015 to 12-02-2018)

3. Lecturer at North Western University, Khulna (from June 2015 to September 2015)

coming soon...

Supervision

SL Title Degree Role Start Date End Date
No Supervision Available

coming soon...

Nizam, Hamalna. Rituparno Ghosh’s Queer Vision Reflected through Rudra : A Look into Chitrangada- The Crowning Wish. Spectrum: Journal of the Department of English, Dhaka University, 2017, Vol.13, 29-40.

Nizam, Hamalna. Discovering Meaning through Translation: Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler in a Cinematic Adaptation. Translation Studies Exploring Identities, writers. ink, 2015, 170-181.

Literary Theory II

English Discipline

Khulna University, Khulna

 

 

Couse Plan

Course Code: Eng 3203 (Section B)

Course Title: Literary Theory II

 

Week

Topic/Part of a text

Core material

Supplementary materials

1

“The Death of the Author”

Ronald Barthes: “The Death of the Author” (1st half of the text)

John Logie: “1967: The Birth of “The Death of the Author””

 

Steven Mallioux: “Textual Scholarship and “Author’s Final Intention””

2

“The Death of the Author”

Ronald Barthes: “The Death of the Author” 

(2nd half of the text)

John Logie: “1967: The Birth of “The Death of the Author””

 

Steven Mallioux: “Textual Scholarship and “Author’s Final Intention””

3

General ideas on Orientalism

Edward Said: Orientalism

Bryan Turner: “Edward W. Said: Overcoming Orientalism”

 

Peter Hees: “Shades of Orientalism: Paradoxes and Problems with Indian Historiography”

4

“Introduction to Orientalism

Edward Said: “Introduction to Orientalism” (part I&II)

Bryan Turner: “Edward W. Said: Overcoming Orientalism”

 

Peter Hees: “Shades of Orientalism: Paradoxes and Problems with Indian Historiography”

 5 

“Introduction to Orientalism

Edward Said: “Introduction to Orientalism” (part III)

Bryan Turner: “Edward W. Said: Overcoming Orientalism”

 

Peter Hees: “Shades of Orientalism: Paradoxes and Problems with Indian Historiography”

6

“Introduction to Orientalism

Edward Said: “Introduction to Orientalism” (part III)

Bryan Turner: “Edward W. Said: Overcoming Orientalism”

 

Peter Hees: “Shades of Orientalism: Paradoxes and Problems with Indian Historiography”

7

Kate Millett

Toril Moi: Sexual/ Textual Politics (chapter: Kate Millett)

Ardienne Rich: “When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-vision”

 

Helene Cixous : “The Laugh of the Medusa”

8

Kate Millett

Toril Moi: Sexual/ Textual Politics (chapter: Kate Millett)

Ardienne Rich: “When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-vision”

 

Helene Cixous : “The Laugh of the Medusa”

9

Elaine Showalter

Toril Moi: Sexual/ Textual Politics (chapter: Elaine Showalter)

Ardienne Rich: “When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-vision”

 

Helene Cixous : “The Laugh of the Medusa”

10

Elaine Showalter

Toril Moi: Sexual/ Textual Politics (chapter: Elaine Showalter)

Ardienne Rich: “When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-vision”

 

Helene Cixous : “The Laugh of the Medusa”

11

“The Commitment to Theory”

Homi k. Bhabha: The Location of Culture (chapter: “The Commitment to Theory”) (part I)

Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffith, Helen Tiffins: Post-Colonial Studies: The Key Concepts

 

Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffith, Helen Tiffins: The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literature

 

12

“The Commitment to Theory”

Homi k. Bhabha: The Location of Culture (chapter: “The Commitment to Theory”) (part I&II)

Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffith, Helen Tiffins: Post-Colonial Studies: The Key Concepts

 

Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffith, Helen Tiffins: The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literature

 

13

“The Commitment to Theory”

Homi k. Bhabha: The Location of Culture (chapter: “The Commitment to Theory”) (part II)

Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffith, Helen Tiffins: Post-Colonial Studies: The Key Concepts

 

Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffith, Helen Tiffins: The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literature

 

 

 

 

References:

 

Ashcroft, B., Griffiths, G. & Tiffin, H. (2002) The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literature, Routledge.

 

Ashcroft, B., Griffiths, G. & Tiffin, H. (2000) Post-Colonial Studies Key Concepts, Routledge.

 

Bhabha, H. K. The Location of Culture, Routledge.

 

Cixous, H., Cohen, K. & Cohen, P. (2017) The Laugh of the Medusa. Signs, 1(4), 875-893.

 

Heehs, P. (2003). Shades of Orientalism: Paradoxes and Problems in Indian Historiography. History and Theory, 42(2), 169-195.

 

Logie, J. (2013) 1967: Birth of “The Death of the Author”. College English, 75(5), 493- 512.

 

Mallioux, S. (2018). Textual Scholarship and Author’s Final Intention. Interpretative Conventions, Cornell University Press, 93-125.

 

Moi, T. (1985) Sexual/ Textual Politics, Routledge.

 

Prakash, G. (1995) Orientalism Now. History and Theory, 34(3), 199-212.

 

Rich, Adrienne. (1972) When we Dead Awaken: Writing as Re- Vision. College English, 34(1), 18-30.

 

Said, E. W. (1978) Orientalism, Penguin Books.

 

Turner, B. (2004) Edward W. Said: Overcoming Orientalism. Theory, Culture & Society, 21(1), 173-177.

 

 

 

 

Name: Hamalna Nizam

 

Signature

Running

Continental Literature

English Discipline

Khulna University, Khulna

 

 

Couse Plan

Course Code: Eng 4209 (Section B)

Course Title: Continental Literature

 

Week

Topic/Part of a text

Core material

Supplementary materials

1

Introduction to Franz Kafka and Kafkaesque

Milan Kundera: “Kafka’s World”

Clegg, Cunha, Munro & de Sousa: “Kafkaesque Power and Bureaucracy” 

Franz Kafka: The Metamorphosis

Franz Kafka: “First Sorrow”

2

Discussion on “A Hunger Artist”

Franz Kafka: “A Hunger Artist”

William c. Rubenstein: “Franz Kafka: A Hunger Artist”

Stanley Corngold: “Principles of Kafka Interpretation”

3

Introduction to Albert Camus

Thomas Polzler: “Camus’ Feeling of the Absurd”

 

 

Mairowitz & Korkos: Introducing Camus: A Graphic Guide

Gina Marie Breen: “Neither Algerian, nor French: Albert Camus’ Pied- Noir Identity

 

4

Text Discussion

Albert Camus: The Outsider (section 1,2&3 of part I)

Albert Camus: “An Absurd Reasoning”

Albert Camus: “Summer in Algiers”

5

Text Discussion

Albert Camus: The Outsider (section 4&5 of part I)

Albert Camus: “The Myth of Sisyphus”

Albert Camus: “Summer in Algiers”

6

Text Discussion

Albert Camus: The Outsider (section 6 of part I and section 1 of part II )

Albert Camus: “The Myth of Sisyphus”

Albert Camus: “Summer in Algiers”

 

7

Text Discussion

Albert Camus: The Outsider (section 2 of part II)

Albert Camus: “The Myth of Sisyphus”

Albert Camus: “Summer in Algiers”

8

Text Discussion

Albert Camus: The Outsider (section 3&4 of part II)

Albert Camus: “The Myth of Sisyphus”

Albert Camus: “Summer in Algiers"

9

Text Discussion

Albert Camus: The Outsider (section 5 of part II & Afterword)

Albert Camus: “The Myth of Sisyphus”

Albert Camus: “Summer in Algiers”

10

Introduction to Bertolt Brecht and Text Discussion on Mother Courage and her Children

Mother Courage and her Children

Ruby Chatterji: Introduction Notes

Book: Mother Courage and Her Children (scene1,2 &3)

Ruby Chatterji: “Introduction Notes

Book: Mother Courage and Her Children

11

Text Discussion

Mother Courage and her Children (scene 4,5& 6)

Zahara Jannesary Ladani: “Reading Brechtian Minds in Mother Courage and her Children through Cognitive Analysis”

 

Paul E. Farmer: “Mother Courage and the Future of War”

12

Text Discussion

Mother Courage and her Children (scene 8&9)

Zahara Jannesary Ladani: “Reading Brechtian Minds in Mother Courage and her Children through Cognitive Analysis”

 

Paul E. Farmer: “Mother Courage and the Future of War”

13

Text Discussion

Mother Courage and her Children (scene 10)

Zahara Jannesary Ladani: “Reading Brechtian Minds in Mother Courage and her Children through Cognitive Analysis”

 

Paul E. Farmer: “Mother Courage and the Future of War”

 

 

 

References:

 

Brecht, B. (1985). Mother Courage and Her Children. Oxford University Press.

 

Breen, G. M. (2019). Neither Algerian, nor French: Albert Camus’ Pied- Noir Identity. Mediterranean Studies, 27 (2), 210-233.

 

Camus, A. The Outsider.

 

Camus, A. (1995). An Absurd Reasoning. The Myth of Sisyphus. Penguin Books, 10-63.

 

Camus, A. (1995). Summer in Algiers. The Myth of Sisyphus. Penguin Books, 125-138.

 

Clegg, S., e Cunha, M. P. Munro, I., Rego, A., & de Sousa, M. O. (2016). Kafkaesque Power and Bureaucracy. Journal of Political Power, 9(2), 157-181.

 

Corngold, S. (1988). Principles of Kafka Interpretation. Franz Kafka: The Necessity of Form. 291-298.

 

Farmer, P. E. (2014). Mother Courage and the Future of War. Social Analysis: The International Journal of Social and Cultural Practice, 52(2), 165-184.

 

Kafka, F. (1998). A Hunger Artist. Kafka: Selected Short Stories. Srishty Publishers, 243-355.

 

Kafka, F. (1998). First Sorrow. Kafka: Selected Short Stories. Srishty Publishers, 231-233.

 

Kafka, F. (1998). Metamorphosis. Kafka: Selected Short Stories. Srishty Publishers, 67-134.

 

Kundera, M. (1988). Kafka’s World. Wilson Quarterly, 12 (5), 88-99.

 

Ladani, Z. J. (2014). Reading Brechtian Minds in Mother Courage and her Children through Cognitive Analysis. International Journal of Management and

Humanity Sciences, S (4), 4305-4315.

 

Mairowitz, D. Z. & Korkos, A. (2012). Introducing Camus: A Graphic Guide, Icon Books.

 

Polzler, T. (2018). Camus’ Feeling of the Absurd. Journal Value Inquiry, 52, 477-490.

 

Rubinstein, W. C. (1952). A Hunger Artist. Monatshefte, 4 (1), 13-19.

 

Name: Hamalna Nizam

Signature:

 

Running

Studies in Shakespeare

English Discipline

Khulna University, Khulna

 

Couse Plan

 

Course Code: Eng 5203 (Section B)

Course Title: Studies in Shakespeare

 

Week

Topic/Part of a text

Core material

Supplementary materials

1

Introducing Julius Caesar and Discussing the text

John Dover Wilson: ‘Introduction’ to Julius Caesar (The Cambridge Dover Wilson Shakespeare)

Shakespeare: Julius Caesar (act I)

Lloyd Davis: “Embodied Masculinity in Julius Caesar

 

Gail Kern Paster:” “In the Spirit of Men there is No Blood”: Blood as Trope of Gender in Julius Caesar”

 

2

Discussing the text

Shakespeare: Julius Caesar (act II)

John Roe: “Julius Caesar: Conscience and Conspiracy”

 

Gail Kern Paster: ““In the Spirit of Men there is No Blood”: Blood as Trope of Gender in Julius Caesar

 

Norman Rabkin: “Structure, Convention and Meaning in Julius Caesar”

3

Discussing the text

Shakespeare: Julius Caesar (act III)

John Roe: “Julius Caesar: Conscience and Conspiracy”

 

Gail Kern Paster: “ “In the Spirit of Men there is No Blood”: Blood as Trope of Gender in Julius Caesar”

 

Norman Rabkin: “Structure, Convention and Meaning in Julius Caesar”

4

Discussing the text

Shakespeare: Julius Caesar (act IV)

John Roe: “Julius Caesar: Conscience and Conspiracy”

 

Gail Kern Paster: “ “In the Spirit of Men there is No Blood”: Blood as Trope of Gender in Julius Caesar”

 

Norman Rabkin: “Structure, Convention and Meaning in Julius Caesar”

5

Discussing the text

Shakespeare: Julius Caesar (act V)

John Roe: “Julius Caesar: Conscience and Conspiracy”

 

Gail Kern Paster: “ “In the Spirit of Men there is No Blood”: Blood as Trope of Gender in Julius Caesar”

 

Norman Rabkin: “Structure, Convention and Meaning in Julius Caesar”

6

General discussion on the text

Shakespeare: Julius Caesar

John Roe: “Julius Caesar: Conscience and Conspiracy”

 

Gail Kern Paster: “ “In the Spirit of Men there is No Blood”: Blood as Trope of Gender in Julius Caesar

Norman Rabkin: “Structure, Convention and Meaning in Julius Caesar”

7

Introducing and discussing Bloom’s ‘Introduction’ to Julius Caesar

Harold Bloom: ‘Introduction’ to Julius Caesar

Jan H. Blits: “Manliness and Friendship in Julius Caesar”

8

Discussion on “Oblique Angles”

Stephen Greenblatt: “Oblique Angles”

Book: Tyrant: Shakespeare on Power

Nicholas Visser: “Plebian Politics in Julius Caesar”

9

Discussion on “Oblique Angles”

Stephen Greenblatt: “Oblique Angles”

Book: Tyrant: Shakespeare on Power

Nicholas Visser: “Plebian Politics in Julius Caesar”

10

Discussion on “Oblique Angles”

Stephen Greenblatt: “Oblique Angles”

Book: Tyrant: Shakespeare on Power

Nicholas Visser: “Plebian Politics in Julius Caesar”

11

Discussion on “Madness in Great Ones”

Stephen Greenblatt: “Madness in Great Ones”

Book: Tyrant: Shakespeare on Power

Daniel Juan Gill: “Bare Life”: “Political Order and the Specter of Antisocial Being in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar”

12

Discussion on “Madness in Great Ones”

Stephen Greenblatt: “Madness in Great Ones”

Book: Tyrant: Shakespeare on Power

Daniel Juan Gill: ““Bare Life”: Political Order and the Specter of Antisocial Being in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar”

13

Discussion on “Madness in Great Ones”

Stephen Greenblatt: “Madness in Great Ones”

Book: Tyrant: Shakespeare on Power

Daniel Juan Gill: “Bare Life”: “Political Order and the Specter of Antisocial Being in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar”

 

 

 

References:

 

Blits, J. H. (2010). Manliness and Friendship in Julius Caesar. Bloom’s Modern Critical Interpretations William Shakespeare’s

Julius Caesar, Infobase Publishing, 31-46.

 

Bloom, H. (2010). Introduction. In H. Bloom (Ed.), William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar

(pp. 1-3). Infobase Publishing

Bloom, H. (2010). Introduction. In H. Bloom (Ed.), William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar

(pp. 1-3). Infobase Publishing

Bloom, H. (2010). Introduction. In H. Bloom (Ed.), William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, Infobase Publishing, 1-3.

 

Davis, L. (2010). Embodied Masculinity in Julius Caesar. Bloom’s Modern Critical Interpretations William Shakespeare’s Julius

Caesar, Infobase Publishing, 115-130.

 

Gill, D. J. (2010). “Bare Life”: Political Order and the Specter of Antisocial Being in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar”. Bloom’s Modern

Critical Interpretations William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, Infobase Publishing, 147-162.

 

Greenblatt, S. (2018). Oblique Angles. Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics, W.W.Norton & Company, 1-23.

 

Greenblatt, S. (2018). Madness in Great Ones. Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics, W.W.Norton & Company, 113-136.

 

Paster, G. K. (1989). In the Spirit of Men there is No Blood”: Blood as Trope of Gender in Julius Caesar. Shakespeare Quarterly,

40 (3), 284-298.

 

Rabkin, N. (1964). Structure, Convention, and Meaning in “Julius Caesar”. The Journal of English and Germanic Philology, 63(2),

240-254.

 

Roe, J. (2010). Julius Caesar: Conscience and Conspiracy. Bloom’s Modern Critical Interpretations William Shakespeare’s Julius

Caesar, Infobase Publishing, 67-114.

 

Shakespeare, W. (2009). Julius Caesar, Cambridge University Press.

 

Visser, N. (2010). Plebian Politics in Julius Caesar. Bloom’s Modern Critical Interpretations William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar,

Infobase Publishing, 47-60.

 

 

 

 

Name: Hamalna Nizam

Signature:

Running
  • Literary Theory II
  • Continental Literature
  • Studies in Shakespeare