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DS 1101
Introduction to Development Studies
3  Credit

DS 1101: Introduction to Development Studies List of References

Core, 3 contact hrs. per week, 3 credit hrs., Prerequisite:  None

Section: A

  1. The meaning of Development: Introduction to Development; Definition and multidimensional nature of development- Economic development, Political development, Social development, Human development, . Rural development, Urban development.
  2. Development of Development Thought: Ideas and evolution of development thinking; Modern critics of development thinking; Recent patterns of thinking on Development.
  3. Measuring Development: The challenges to measure Development; Development Indicators and their uses; Example of Development Indicator- Human development Index, Gender Development Index, other composite indices.
  4. Historical perspective on Development: Pre-colonial development; colonial development; post-ward II development; modern development.
  5. Contemporary Issues in Development: Issues and their relevance to study in Development Studies- global poverty and inequality; Water, sanitization and health, gender mainstreaming and women empowerment, Sustainability and climate change.

Section:  B

  1. Globalization and Development: Introduction, meaning and perspective on Globalization; many faces of globalization; impacts of globalization on development.
  2. Environment and Development: Development, Environment and Poverty nexus; Bad growth and good growth; Introduction, meaning and perspective of Globalization and its consequence for development.
  3. Global initiatives for development: Millennium Development Goal (MDG), Sustainable Development Summit, North-South Cooperation; South-South Cooperation.
  4. Civil Society, NGOs and Social Movements for Development: Role of Local and International NGOS and Civil Society in various spheres of Development.
  5. Development Aid and Development:  Role of Bilateral & other agencies- DIFD, USAID, AusAID, NORAD, JICA, CIDA SIDA, SCD, UNDP, FAO, WFP,UNEP in various spheres of Development.
  6. International Financial Institutions: Role of Multilateral Institutions- ADB, World Bank, IDB, IMF in various spheres of Development.

List of References

  • Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1999.
  • Desai, and R. Potter (eds.), The Companion to Development Studies, 3rd edition, Arnold, London, 2014.
  • Mahbub-ul-Haq Centre for Human Development, Rural Development in South Asia” in Human Development in South Asia, pp. 78-95, 2002
  • McGillivray, ‘Redundant Composite Development Indicator,’ World Development 19 (10), pp.1461-1468;
  • Ravallion, ‘Good and Bad Growth: The Human Development Reports’, World Development, 25, 5 pps.631-638, 1997.
  • McMichael, Development and Social Change; A Global Perspective, 2nd edition, Pine Forge Press, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2000.
  • Corbridge, S. (ed.), Development Studies: a reader, Arnold, London. 1995.
  • Zaidi, S. Akbar, The New Development Paradigm: papers on institutions, NGOs, gender and local government, OUP, 1999.
  • Colas, International Civil Society: Social Movements in World Politics, Polity Press, Cambridge, London, 2002.
  • Lele, ‘Sustainable development: a critical review ‘, World Development Vol. 19, No. 6, 1991.

 
DS 1103
Structure of Bangladesh Economy
3  Credit

DS 1103: Structure of Bangladesh Economy

Core, 3 contact hrs. per week, 3 credit hrs., Prerequisite:  None

Section: A

  1. Introduction: Overview of Bangladesh economy; Sectors of Bangladesh economy; Growth of GDP, GNP, and NNP; Savings and investment.
  2. Agriculture: Growth; Farm size and tenancy structure; Landlessness and impact on production; Employment and income; Pricing and marketing of agro-products; Subsidy policy; Problems of agricultural development.
  3. Industry: Industrial background and growth; Structure of industrial sector and thrust sub-sectors; Labour force and employment; Role of public and private sectors in industrial development; Capital supply; FDI and Special Economic zone; Industrial policy.
  4. Export and Import: Export and import items; Export income and import expenditure; Balance of trade and balance of payments; Export incentives.
  5. Banking and Insurance: Role of public and private banks, insurance companies, and other financial institutions in deposit mobilization; Long, medium and short term loans;

Section:  B

  1. Human Resources: Dependency ratio, Expectancy of life; Labour force; Literacy and education; Skill development facilities; Manpower export and Remittance.
  2. Education: Types of Institutions; Role in skill development; Public, Private and other initiatives for human resources development through education and training.
  3. Science and Technology: Role of ICT in economic development;
  4. Employment: Present employment situation; Steps, policies and programs for employment creation; Gender wise analysis of employment situation; Impact on economy.
  5. Poverty: Present status; Rural vs. urban poverty; Causes of poverty; Poverty vs. economic development; Policies and programs for poverty eradication.
  6. Women Development: Status of women; Literacy and constraints of women development; Initiatives for women empowerment.

List of References

  • A. Malabre Jr., Understanding the New Economy, IRWIN, Illinois, 1998.
  • Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Statistics Division, Ministry of Planning, Govt. of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh, Statistical Yearbook of Bangladesh - Various Issues.
  • Bangladesh Economic Association, Bangladesh Journal of Political Economy, Volume 26, Number 2, December, 2010.
  • B. Schiller, The Economy Today, 12th edition, McGraw Hill, New York, 2010.
  • Department of Public Relations and Publications, Bangladesh Bank, Bangladesh Bank Bulletin - Various Issues.
  • H. Z. Rahman and M. Hossain, Rethinking Rural Poverty: Bangladesh as a Case Study, UPL, 1995.
  • M. Hossain, Green Revolution in Bangladesh - Problems, Policies and Prospects, UPL, 1988.
  • Planning Commission, Govt. of Bangladesh, Five Year Plan (1-6).
  • Planning Commission, Govt. of Bangladesh, Bangladesh Economic Review (2005-2012).
  • Statistics Department, Bangladesh Bank, Economic Trends - Various Issues.
DS 1105
Introduction to Government and Politics
3  Credit

DS 1105: Introduction to Government and Politics

Core, 3 contact hrs. per week, 3 credit hrs., Prerequisite:  None

Section: A

  1. Introduction to Public Administration: Concepts, nature, scope, and significance of study.
  2. Key schools of thoughts and scholarly contribution
  3. Theories of Public Administration: Institutional theories, Cultural Theories, New public management, Good governance.
  4. Bureaucracy: Evolution of concept, theories, roles. 
  5. Public Administration vs. Private Administration: Power, function, authority, legitimacy, decision making.
  6. Local government system: Concept, form and structure, roles.
  7. Local governance in Bangladesh: Historical perspective, evolution, development, current form, roles in local development.

Section:  B

  1. Introduction to Political Science: Nature, scope and significance of study; relationships with other social sciences.
  2. State affairs: Theories of state development; function of a modern state; welfare state- meaning, form and functioning.
  3. Major political ideologies/movements: Conservatism, Liberalism, Utilitarianism Totalitarianism, Socialism, Capitalism, Communism.
  4. Forms of Government: Democracy and dictatorship; Unitary and federal, parliamentary and presidential system of government.
  5. Organs of Government: Legislature, executive and judiciary.
  6. Political System of Bangladesh: Political Parties and Electoral system; Legislature, Executive, and Judiciary Cabinet.

List of References

  • C. Kapur, Principles of Political Science, 5th edition, S Chand and Company Limited, India, 2011.
  • H. Huque, Paradoxes in Public Administration: Dimensions of Development, UPL, Dhaka, 1990.
  • Z. Rahman, Engaging on ‘Good Governance’: A Search for Entry Point, PPRC Dhaka, 2005.
  • W. Garner, Political Science and Government, IRWIN Inc., 1989.
  • D. White, Introduction to the Study of Public Administration, Allen and Unwin, 1992.
  • M. A. W. Bhuiyan, Adhunik Rastrobiggan (Bangla), 15th edition, Globe Library (P) Ltd.,
  • S. S. Islam, Snatok Rastrobiggan (Bangla), 7th edition, Hasan Book House, Dhaka, 1999.
  • World Bank, Bangladesh: Government that Works: Reforming the Public Sector. Dhaka 1996
DS 1106
Computer Applications for Development Studies (Lab/Project)
1.5  Credit

DS 1106: Computer Applications for Development Studies (Lab/Project)

Core, 3 hours per week, 1.5 credit hours, Prerequisite: None Studio and/ or Lab. based, this sessional course will be confined in Word Processing, Spreadsheet Analysis, and Presentation software available in the Discipline/University. In this class students will be trained to have working knowledge on major applications of window based word processing (preferably MS Word), Spread Sheet Analysis (preferably Excel software), and Power Point Presentation. At least 3 Lab. examinations followed by VIVA would be conducted.
  1. Introductory:    Concept on file, folder, CPU, key board, mouse, floppy disk, hard disk, windows   and the like peripherals.
  2. File Management: Creation of file, saving of file, deleting file, editing document / file variable, file copy, file move etc.
  3. Formatting:      Font related, paragraph related, drop case, spelling, change case, function and equation.
  4. Tables and Graph: Draw table, insert table, split table, merger cell.
  5. Mathematical and Statistical Function:  Summation, subtraction, multiplication, frequency, standard deviation, variance, mean, median, line, bar, pie graph, correlation, regression, etc.
  6. Page Setup and Printing: page set up, layout, print preview, printing.
  7. Presentation: Layout, format, use of graphics; professional presentation.
Econ 1151
Fundamentals of Micro Economics
3  Credit

Econ 1151: Fundamentals of Micro Economics

Core, 3 contact hrs. per week, 3 credit hrs., Prerequisite:  None

Section: A

  1. Introduction: Definition of economics; Nature and scope of economics; Micro versus macroeconomics; Positive versus normative economics.
  2. Basic Concepts: Scarcity; Choice; Want; Commodity; Utility; Wealth; Value; Price; Welfare; Production; Exchange; Distribution; Consumption; Economic good versus free good; Economic system; Basic economic problems; Solution of basic economic problems; Circular flow of income; Production possibility curve.
  3. Demand and Supply: Concept of demand and supply; Law of demand and supply; Determinants of demand and supply; Movement along demand and supply curves; Shifting of demand  and supply curves; Market demand curve; Market equilibrium; Consumers’ surplus and producers’ surplus; Shift of equilibrium.
  4. Elasticity of Demand and Supply: Various concepts of elasticity; Price, income, cross and supply elasticity.

Section:  B

  1. Economics of Consumer Behaviour and Utility Analysis: Concept of total and marginal utility; Law of diminishing marginal utility; Marshallian utility analysis; Indifference curve analysis; Consumer’s equilibrium; Change in income and prices; Price-consumption curve; Income, substitution and price effect for normal, inferior and Giffen goods.
  2. Economics of Production: Factors of production; Total, average and marginal products; Stages of production; Law of diminishing return.
  3. Theory of Cost and Revenue: Short run and long run cost; Fixed and variable cost; Average, marginal and total cost; Envelope curve; Concept of total, average and marginal revenue.
  4. Theory of market: Definition; Classification; Characteristics of perfectly competitive and monopoly markets; Monopolistic competition; Oligopoly and duopoly; Non-collusive oligopoly.
  5. Welfare Economics: Concept of Pareto optimality; Pareto optimality in consumption, production and in general; Indeterminacy problem in the Pareto criterion; Concept of social welfare function; Bliss point; Welfare maximization and perfect competition.

List of References

  • D. Salvator, Microeconomics: Theory and Applications, 5th , Oxford University Press, USA, 2008.
  • Ahuja, H.L., Advanced Economic theory: Microeconomic Analysis, 13th Ed., S. Chand and Co. Ltd. New Delhi-4, 2003.
  • Varian, H. R., Intermediate Microeconomics: A Modern Approach, 7th Ed., New York, Norton, 2006.
  • Dewett  K.K., Modern  Economic  Theory,  S.  Chand  &  Company  Ltd.,  Revised Edition 2005.
  • J. Nobbs and IAN Hopkins, Economics - A Core Text, 4th , McGraw International (UK) Ltd., 1995.
  • J. Gould and E. P. Lazear, Micro Economic Theory, 6th Ed., Richard D. IRWIN Inc., Illinois, 1993.
  • P. Samuelson and W. Nordhaus, Economics, 19th Ed., Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2009.
  • Ruffin, R.J., and Gregory, P.R., Principles of Economics. 7th Ed., Boston, USA: Addison Wesley, 2000.
  • R. Pindyck and D. L. Rubinfeld, Micro Economics, 7th Ed., Prentice-Hall Inc. 2009.
Soc 1153
Introduction to Sociology and Anthropology
3  Credit

Soc 1153: Introduction to Sociology and Anthropology

Core, 3 contact hrs. per week, 3 credit hrs., Prerequisite:  None

Section: A

  1. Introduction: definition, nature, and importance of sociology in relation to development intervention.
  2. Basic concepts: society; community; association; institution; organization; group; customs; tradition.
  3. Social structure and stratification: definition, types and elements of social structure; Marxist and non-Marxist view about social structure; social stratification of urban and rural community of Bangladesh and its impact on development.
  4. General Sociological Theory: Conflict theory, Role Theory, Functionalist theory, Integration Theory.
  5. Social institutions: family, kinship, religion, education, mass-media, government and state.
  6. Social problem: crime, juvenile delinquency, unemployment, illiteracy; ill health and hunger.
  7. Social control: definition; agencies; role of family and religion in social control.
  8. Social change: concept, nature, pattern, causes and consequence; role of principals and agents.

Section:  B

  1. Introduction: Anthropology- definition, nature and scope; major field of anthropology; relation of Anthropology with other developmental sciences.
  2. Anthropological perspective: Holism, Ethnocentrism, Cultural relativism, Evolutionism; Functionalism; Structural Functionalism; Symbolic Interactionalism/Interpretive Postmodernism
  3. Culture: definition and elements, origin and development of culture, cultural diffusion, acculturation, cultural trait and cultural complex, culture and civilization; theory of cultural lag and its impact on development.
  4. Types of society and modes of production: Hunting, Gathering, Pastoral agrarian and industrial society; Slavery, Feudalism, Capitalism, Socialism, and communism.
  5. Anthropology and Cost of Development: Cultural extinction; Environmental degradation; Income inequality; Grassroots movement and resistance to ill development; Socio-cultural consequences of development interventions.

List of References

  • Giddens, Introduction to Sociology, 7th edition, W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 2009.
  • D.G. Bates. Cultural Anthropology, Allyn and Bacon, Boston, 1996.
  • M. Henslin, Sociology, Allyn and Bacon, Boston, 2001.
  • Kotttak, Conrad P. Anthropology: The Exploration of Human Diversity, 9th edition Boston: McGraw-Hil, 2002
  • Langness, L.L.,The study of culture, 3rd edition, Novato, CA: Chandler & Sharp, 2005.
  • M. Maclver and C.H. Page, Society: An Introductory Analysis. MacMillary India limited, Mumbai, India, 1996.
  • A. Erickson and L. D. Murphy, A History of Anthropological Theory, University of Toronto Press, Higher Education Division; 4th edition, 2013.
  • Berger, Invitation to Sociology, Penguin, London, 1986.
  • Sharma, Principles of Sociology. Media Promoters and Publishers Pvt. Ltd, Mumbai, India, 1963.
Eng 1155
English for Development Communication
3  Credit

Eng 1155: English for Development Communication

Core, 3 contact hrs. per week, 3 credit hrs., Prerequisite:  None

Section: A

  1. Parts of Speech: Types and usages.
  2. Tense: Right forms of verbs and subject-verb agreement.
  3. Formation of Words and Sentences: Affixes; Rules of syntax; Use of participles and ‘to’ infinitives; Sequences of tenses.
  4. Use of Words and Phrases: Phrases; Group verbs; Use of modals; Sentence connectors.
  5. Use of Verb: Phrasal verb; Finite and non-finite verbs.
  6. Vocabulary Enrichment: Content words (which appear in more than one forms, e.g. able – ability – enableably) and their use in sentences; Appropriate prepositions; Single word for a group of words (e.g. incapable of being admitted - inadmissible).
  7. Construction of Sentences: Sentence structure; Transformation of sentences; Conditional sentences.

Section:  B

  1. Conversation practice & dialogue writing: Context/situation specific
  2. Free composition: Amplification; Precise writing, Paragraph & Essay writing.
  3. Reading Comprehension.
  4. Editorial skill development in writing and verbal communication - technical and official correspondence
  5. Vocabulary: phrases and Idioms; synonyms and antonyms; prefixes and suffixes.

List of References

  • A.J. Thomson, and A. V. Martinet, A Practical English Grammar, Exercises 1, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1997.
  • A.J. Thomson, and A. V. Martinet, A Practical English Grammar, Exercises 2, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1997.
  • S. Horby, Guide to Patterns and Usage in English, 2nd Ed., Oxford University Press, London, 1975.
  • S. Allen, Living English Structure, 5th Ed., Pearson Education, 2009.
  • Biackstone, A Manual of Advanced English. Longmans Green & Co. Ltd., Oxford, London.
  • A. Hill, Contextualized vocabulary, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1970.
  • Taylor, Advance Language Skills. The University Press Ltd, Dhaka 1978.