Search By Term :
Search by Course Title:
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in comments
Search in excerpt
Search in posts
Search in pages
Search in groups
Search in users
Search in forums
Filter by Custom Post Type
ku_course
Filter by Categories
ENG 1101
Introduction to Poetry
04  Credit
The course aims to instill in the students the passion and love for poetry. The students will read the significant poems written by the major poets. By taking the course, they will be able to critically appreciate poetry.   Section A  
  1. William Shakespeare: Sonnet 130: “My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun”; Sonnet 18: “Shall I compare thee to a Summer’s day”
  2. John Donne: “The Canonization”
  3. William Blake: “The Sick Rose”
  4. Christina Rossetti: “An Apple-Gathering”
  5. Robert Herrick: “To Daffodils”
  6. Robert Browning: “The Patriot”
  Section B  
  1. W B Yeats: “The Lake Isle of Innisfree”
  2. Robert Frost: “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”
  3. Ezra Pound: “The River-Merchant’s Wife: A Letter”
  4. Adrienne Rich: “Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers”
  5. Seamus Heaney: “Digging”
  6. Kaiser Haq: “Ode On The Lungi”
  Suggested Texts: Byam, Nina, et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of American Literature. 8th ed. 2 vols. New York: Norton, 2012. Print. Ferguson, Margaret W., et al., eds.: The Norton Anthology of Poetry. New York: Norton,   2005. Print. Greenblatt, Stephen, et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 9th ed. 6 vols. New York: Norton, 2012. Print. Haq, Kaiser. Published in the Streets of Dhaka: Collected Poems. Dhaka: UPL, 2012. Print. Zaman, Niaz, ed. American Voices: An American Literature Reader. 2 vols. Dhaka: writers.ink, 2006. Print.   Suggested References: Abrams, M. H. and Geoffrey Galt Harpham, eds. A Glossary of Literary Terms. Stamford: Cengage Learning, 2014. Print. Boulton, Marjorie. The Anatomy of Poetry. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print. Cuddon J. A., ed. Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. London: Penguin Books, 1999. Print. Gill, Richard. Mastering English Literature. 2nd ed. London: Macmillan, 1995. Print. Hudson, W. H. An Introduction to the Study of Literature. Massachussets: HardPress, 1960. Print. Martin, Stephen. English Literature: A Student Guide. 3rd ed. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print. Wainright, Jeffrey. Poetry: The Basics. New York: Routledge, 2010. Print.  
ENG 2101
History of English Language
3.00  Credit
The course is designed to familiarise the students with the history of English Language with a focus on its development over the centuries.   SectionA  
  1. Genetic and Typological properties of English
  2. Origins of English
  3. Old English
  4. Foreign influences on Old English
  5. The Norman Conquest and its influence on English
  6. Middle English
  7. Reestablishment of English
  Section B  
  1. Early Modern English
  2. English in the Age of Science
  3. English in the Age of Imperial Expansion
  4. English in America
  5. English in India
  6. English as a World Language
  7. World Englishes
  Suggested References:   Barber, Charles, Joan C. Beal, and Philip A. Shaw. The English Language.2nd ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2009. Print. Baugh, Albert C., and Thomas Cable. A History of the English Language.5th ed. London: Routledge, 2002. Print. Crystal, David. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language. 3rd ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2010. Print. Lyovin, Anatole V. An Introduction to the Languages of the World. Oxford: OUP, 1996. Print. Yule, George. The Study of Language. 4th ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2010. Print.  
Eng 1105
Introduction to Prose—Fiction
4.00  Credit
By attending the course, the students will learn about the genres such as novel, short story, novella, science fiction, etc. They will also be familiar with literary terms and devices such as popular culture, theme, point of view, setting, style, narrative technique, etc.  Section A 
  1. Jonathan Swift: Gulliver’s Travels (Part I)
  2. Joseph Addison and Richard Steele: The Coverley Papers (“Sir Roger at the Church”)
  3. Charles Lamb: Essays of Elia (“Old China”)
  4. Edgar Allan Poe: “Tell-Tale Heart” 
  5. Katherine Mansfield: “Her First Ball”
Section B 
  1. Rudyard Kipling: “The Strange Ride of Morrowbie Jukes”
  2. H. G. Wells: “The Empire of the Ants”
  3. George Orwell: “Shooting an Elephant”
  4. W. Somerset Maugham: “The Luncheon”
  5. R. K. Narayan: “An Astrologer’s Day”
Suggested Texts: Byam, Nina, et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of American Literature. 8th ed. 2 vols. New York: Norton, 2012. Print. Greenblatt, Stephen, et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 9th ed. 6 vols. New York: Norton, 2012. Print. Hammond, John, ed. The Complete Short Stories of H.G. Wells. London: Phoenix P, 2000.Print. Kennedy, J. Gerald, ed. The Portable Poe. London: Penguin, 2006. Print. Narayan, R. K. “An Astrologer’s Day” and Other Stories. New Delhi: Ind-Us, 1981. Print. Swift, Jonathan. Gulliver's Travels and Other Writings. Ed. Clement Hawes. Massachussets: Houghton Mifflin, 2004. Print. Zaman, Niaz, ed. American Voices: An American Literature Reader. 2 vols. Dhaka: writers.ink, 2006. Print.  Suggested References: Abrams, M. H. and Geoffrey Galt Harpham, eds. A Glossary of Literary Terms. Stamford: Cengage  Learning, 2014. Print. Boulton, Marjorie. The Anatomy of Prose. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print. Cuddon J. A., ed. Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. London: Penguin, 1999. Print. Gill, Richard. Mastering English Literature. 2nd ed. London: Macmillan, 1995. Print. Haque, Ahsanul, et al., eds. Prose of Our Time. 2nd ed. Dhaka: Nawroze, 1993. Print. Hudson, W. H. An Introduction to the Study of Literature. Massachussets:  HardPress, 1960. Print. Khatri, Chhote Lal. R. K. Narayan: Reflections and Re-evaluation. New Delhi: Sarup & Sons, 2006. Print. Martin, Stephen. English Literature: A Student Guide. 3rd ed. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.
Eng 1110
Sessional on English Grammar
1.5  Credit
Sessional on English Grammar aims to develop the students’ command on English Grammar. The following topics will be discussed and practiced in the class: study of words: types and transformations; phrase and clause: types and structures; Sentence: types, structures and transformations; punctuation; Students will be asked to demonstrate their ability in producing grammatically correct and appropriate sentences. Suggested Texts: Leech, Geoffrey, and Jan Svartvik. A Communicative Grammar of English. Essex: Longman, 2010. Print. Quirk, Randolph, and Sidney Greenbaum. A University Grammar of English. Chennai: Longman, 2000. Print.  Suggested References: Baker, Ann. Ship or Sheep. Cambridge: CUP, 1998. Print. Hornby, A.S. Oxford Learner’s Dictionary of Current English. Oxford: OUP, 2005. Print. Sinclair, John, et al., ed. Collins Cobuild English Usage for Learners. Glasgow: Harper Collins, 2004. Print. Sinha, R P. Current English Grammar and Usage with Composition. Oxford: OUP, 2012. Print. Swan, Michael. Practical English Usage. 3rd ed. Oxford: OUP, 2006. Print. Thomson, A. J. and A. V. Martinet. A Practical English Grammar. 4th ed.  Oxford: OUP, 1986. Print.
Eng 1112
Sessional on Listening and Speaking
1.5  Credit
The sessional course aims to improve listening and speaking skills of the students so that they can better understand, appreciate and enjoy English language and literature. The purpose of the course is to refresh and reactivate the students’ previously acquired knowledge of the language. As such, they will be asked to participate in various oral situations like conversation, monologue, role-play, debate, etc. They will also experience listening based tasks such as listening to dictation, news, recitation, speeches, taking various types of tests on listening, etc.  Suggested References: Gordon, R.L. Interviewing Strategy, Techniques and Tactics. Illinois: Dorsey Press, 1976. Print. Pease, A. Body Language. New Delhi: Sudha Publications, 1999. Print. Simpson, J. A, and E. S. C. Weiner. The Oxford English Dictionary. 2nd ed. 20 Vols. Oxford: OUP, 1991. Print.
CSE 1156
Sessional on Computer Skills Development
1.5  Credit
Students will be acquainted with the basic application and operation of computer. Suggested References: Duffy, Jennifer. Illustrated Course Guide: Microsoft Word 2010 Basic. Massachusetts: Cengage Learning, 2010. Print. Miller, Michael. Absolute Beginner's Guide to Computer Basics. Indiana: Que Publishing, 2007. Print. ---. Easy Computer Basics: Windows 7 Edition. New Jersey: Pearson Education, 2009. Print. Pinard, Katherine T., et al. Microsoft Word 2007: Introductory. Massachusetts: Cengage Learning, 2007. Print. Stephen, Moira. Teach Yourself Basic Computer Skills. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2004. Print. Story, Laura, and Dawna Walls.  Microsoft Office 2007 Fundamentals. Massachusetts: Cengage Learning, 2007. Print. ---. Microsoft Office 2010 Fundamentals. Massachusetts: Cengage Learning, 2010. Print.
Eng 1201
Introduction to Prose—Non-Fiction
4.00  Credit
The course aims to give the students an orientation with a variety of English prose of different periods.  Section A  Francis Bacon                      : “Of Marriage and Single life”, “Of Studies”
  1. Samuel Johnson                  : Lives of the Poets: Milton
  2. James Baldwin                     : “Stranger in the Village”
  3. E. M. Forster                         : “What I Believe”
 Section B
  1. J. S. Mill                 : Autobiography (Chapter 5)
  2. Aldous Huxley                     : “Tragedy and the Whole Truth”
  3. Matthew Arnold                  : “Culture and Anarchy” (as in Norton Anthology)
  4. Virginia Woolf                      : “Modern Fiction”
 Suggested Texts: Greenblatt, Stephen, et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 9th ed. 6 vols. New York: Norton, 2012. Print. Leitch, Vincent B., et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of Literary Theory and Criticism. New York: Norton, 2001. Print.  Suggested References: Anderson, Chris. Literary Nonfiction: Theory, Criticism, Pedagogy. Ed. Chris Anderson. Michigan: U of Michigan P, 2008. Print. Carolyn, Forché, and Philip Gerard, eds. Writing Creative Nonfiction. Ohio: Writer’s Digest, 2001. Print. Turco, Lewis. The Book of Literary Terms: The Genres of Drama, Fiction, Nonfiction, Literary Criticism, and Scholarship. Hanover: UP of New England, 1999. Print.
Eng 1203
Introduction to Drama
4.00  Credit
The course will help the students understand different types of dramatic work, such as tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy as well as ingredients of drama like action, plot, conflict, characterization, style, etc. Section A
  1. Sophocles                              : King Oedipus
  2. Aristotle                                 : Poetics (selections)
Section B
  1. Oliver Goldsmith                  : She Stoops to Conquer
  2. J.M. Synge                            : Riders to the Sea 
 Suggested Texts: Aristotle. Poetics. Ed. John Baxter and Patrick Atherton. Trans. George Whalley. Quebec: McGill-Queen's Press, 1997. Print. Grene, David. Introduction. Oedipus: The King. By Sophocles. Trans. David Grene. Chicago: The U of Chicago P, 2010. Print. Goldsmith, Oliver. She Stoops to Conquer. New York: Courier Dover, 2012. Print. Synge, J. M. Riders to the Sea. New York: Hayes Barton, 2008. Print.  Suggested References: Mathews, P. J., ed. The Cambridge Companion to J. M. Synge. Cambridge: CUP, 2009. Print. Ormand, Kirk, ed. A Companion to Sophocles. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. Print. Rorty, Amélie Oksenberg, ed. Essays on Aristotle’s Poetics. New Jersey: Princeton UP, 1992. Print. Rousseau, G. S., ed. Oliver Goldsmith: The Critical Heritage. New York: Routledge, 2007. Print. Rush, David.  A Student Guide to Play Analysis. Illinois: SIU Press, 2005. Print. Synge, J. M. “Riders to the Sea” and “The Playboy of the Western World”. Ed. R. K. Kaul. New Delhi: OUP, 2011. Print. wmO, Rb wgwjsUb. ivBWvm© Uz `¨ mx. Abyev` I m¤úv`bv. Avn‡g` Avnmvby¾vgvb. cwiewa©Z ms¯‹iY. XvKv: †d«Ûm eyK Kb©vi, 1994.
Eng 1205
Reading and Writing
3.00  Credit
Section A: Reading
  1. Perspectives on reading comprehension; Elements of reading: vocabulary, syntax and meaning
  2. Reading strategies: intensive and extensive reading; scanning and skimming; prediction and inference; reader’s expectation and interpretation; contextual understanding and understanding the whole text; critical reading and analysis; effective note-taking
  3. Reading tasks: reading academic texts; reading newspaper, and magazines
Section B: Writing
  1. Understanding academic writing: Features of academic writing; Elements of academic writing; Approaches to writing: Product and Process; Generating ideas for a writing task; Logically synthesizing and organizing diverse information; Developing focus in academic writing; Drafting and supporting ideas with evidence; Integrating data and graphics in texts; Maintaining academic style; Revising, critiquing and evaluating texts
  2. Modes of writing: Descriptive writing, Argumentative writing, Narrative writing, Comparative and contrastive writing
  3. Writing tasks: paragraph, essay, summary, précis, abstract, letter of application, assignments, examination paper writing and writing & designing presentation slides
Suggested References: Hefferman, A. W. J. Writing: A College Handbook. 5th ed. New York: Norton, 2000. Print. Gillett, A., Hammond, A., and M. Martala. Successful Academic Writing. London: Pearson Longman, 2009. Print. Greenall, S. and M. Swan. Effective Reading. Melbourne: CUP, 2001. Print. McCormack, J. and J. Slaght. English for Academic Study: Extended Writing and Research Skills, Reading: New York: Garnet Publishing. 2005. Print. Sowton, C. 50 Steps to Improving Your Academic Writing, Reading. New York: Garnet Publishing, 2012. Print. Philpot, S., and L. Curnic. Academic Skills: Reading, Writing, and Study Skills. Oxford: Headway, 2012. Print. Rogers, L. Writing Skills. London: DELTA, 2011. Print. Spears, D. M. Improving Reading Skills. 4th ed. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2000. Print. Tibbitts, E. L. Exercises in Reading Comprehension. Essex: Longman, 1982. Print.
Eng 1207
History of American Literature
3.00  Credit
The course aims to familiarise the students with the major socio-political and cultural turns in the history of American literature.  Section A
  1. The Colonial Period
  2. The Revolutionary Age
  3. The American Independence
  4. The American Renaissance
Section B
  1. The Realistic Period
  2. The Naturalistic Movement
  3. The Great Economic Depression
  4. The Jazz Age and the Lost Generation
 Suggested References: Bercovitch, Sacvan, et al., eds. The Cambridge History of American Literature. 8 vols. Cambridge: CUP, 2008. Print. Gray, Richard. A History of American Literature. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. Print. A Brief History of American Literature. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. Print. Martin, Linda Wagner-. A History of American Literature: 1950 to the Present. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 2012. Print. 
Page 1 of 612345...Last »